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The Divine Comedy

The importance of laughter, humour and comedy.


Last week, I wrote about the necessity for light-heartedness in amongst everyday life, and this week I felt the need to extend that thematic exploration, robbing the title from Dante’s most famous works (sorry, mate). While I doubt this will be remembered 700 years on like its namesake is, hopefully you won’t be rushing to throw it into the inferno.



They say laughter is the best medicine

But too much is considered poison

Although many die laughing

And plenty sent to hell,

Those offended feel

The greatest of ills


A funny world or,

A world where no one was offended?

You can’t have both

Decent or indecent

The King who kills,

His jester is a tyrant


Is comedy a crime?

Or is it divine?

Antidote for the working class

Against the brass

Let me tell you a story

A humourless world is purgatory


It’s just a joke

Don’t take it so serious

Wrongdoings using a mask

But our efforts to reduce offence

Is taking experiencing joy to task

Humour on eggshells isn’t funny


A yearn for light-heartedness

The need for the playful

What else do we do for relief

Against the stressful

Moments of hilarity save us

The droll and the witty

People don’t know what they want

But yet somehow claim they do

However, we’re still a long, long way

From Paradiso

Humans never cease to amuse

Just watch the trigger on a short fuse


The humour hierarchy

The lieutenants of laughter

The constables of comedy

Do we really control what we find hilarious?

It is the uncontrollable laughter

That is the heartiest laugh of all


A sense of humour

A quality characteristic,

One that all desire

But do you risk slipping up?

A mistake will send you,

From the fat to the fire


Comedy is sacred

But is the sacred, comedy?

A greater importance

There may never be

To do away with our ability to laugh

Would be the greatest tragedy



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